Jewish cuisine

The Jewishcuisine is the multitude of inspirations and variety of flavours, it is a mapdrawn by the history. Wherever Jews lived, they borrowed from local traditions,using available products. However, all dishes had to be adapted to Jewishreligious law, so that they could be referred to as kosher i.e. fit for consumption.Many dishes of the Galician Jews’ cuisine contain elements originating in the Polish,Rusyn or Austrian culinary culture. The common features of most varieties of theJewish cuisine is the abundant use of certain spices (nutmeg, cloves, saffron, caraway),frequent use of onion and garlic. However, food eaten on an everyday basisdiffered from dishes served on the occasion of festivals or Shabbats. Theannual cycle of festivals was related to ritual dishes such as matza forPassover, Hamantash eaten on the occasion of Purim or cholent eaten on Shabbats. The mutualrelationship is evidenced by the fact that terms such as tzimmes, challah, Shabbatoven or bagels came into use in Polish. When talking about the last ones– round buns with a hole in the middle, which captivated the palates of peopleall over the world – they come from the 16th century, from Krakow inMałopolska. Now, in Krakow we may find in the remains of formed Galician inns - austerias and althoughmost of them do not have a kosher certificate, thanks to them we can taste the mostinteresting Jewish dishes and alcohols, while listening to concerts oftraditional klezmer music.